The North Coast of Peru among the 52 places to go (by New York Times)

On Jan 09, 2015 The New York Times – Travel published and article on the 52 Places to Go in 2015.

They say that “Untrammeled oases beckon, once-avoided destinations become must-sees and familiar cities offer new reasons to visit”.

  1. Milan, Italy
  2. Cuba
  3. Philadelphia
  4. Yellowstone National Park
  5. Elqui Valley, Chile
  6. Singapore
  7. Durban, South Africa
  8. Bolivia
  9. Faroe Islands
  10. Macedonia
  11. Medellín, Colombia
  12. St. Vincent and the Grenadines
  13. Orlando, Florida
  14. Zimbabwe
  15. Burgundy, France
  16. Lower Manhattan, New York
  17. Tanzania
  18. The North Coast of Peru – A desert coast begs to be explored.
    As tourism in Peru expands beyond the obligatory trip to Cuzco, this  often overlooked  desert region  is opening up.
    The company Lindblad Cruises has added stops in Trujillo,  near important archaeological sites like the adobe city of Chan Chan and the Moche pyramid complexes of Sipán and El Brujo, which have opened  museums in  recent years.  In town, the Libertador   hotel is set in a Spanish colonial mansion,
    Farther north, you reach the Chaparrí Reserve outside of Chiclayo,  a habitat for highly  threatened Andean spectacle bears. Chaparri Reserve will have a bit of pop-cultural relevance this year with the release of  a Paddington  Bear  film,  built around a member  of the species “from deepest, darkest Peru.
    If you’d prefer nature by day and boutique digs by night, the eco-hotelier  Inkaterra  is  following up   the opening of  the six-room KiCHIC,   in  the low-key  surf village  of  Mancora,   by  laying the groundwork  for community- based tourism projects  like sport-fishing  and  whale-watching  charters  at nearby Cabo Blanco, a former  Hemingway  fishing  hangout,  while pushing  to  establish  a marine reserve and eventually a hotel. (Written by NICHOLAS GILL)
    Besides these  places that  The New York Times  mentions,  you Have Caral, The oldest Civilization of American and The Chavin the Huantar Laberynth  that can be e asuly combinesd  with the North Coast. A trip that begins in Lima and goes up to the North crossing Caral, Huaraz and reaching Trujillo and finally Chiclayo. This will be once in a lifetime experience.
  19. Steamboat Springs, Colorado
  20. Oman
  21. Cleveland, Ohio
  22. Sri Lanka
  23. New Orleans, Louisiana
  24. Adelaide, Australia
  25. Georgia
  26. Manchester, England
  27. Campeche, Mexico
  28. Greenland
  29. Papua New Guinea
  30. Bend, Oregon
  31. Rabat, Morocco
  32. Squamish, Canada
  33. Seoul, South Korea
  34. St. Kitts
  35. Shikoku, Japan
  36. San Antonio
  37. San José del Cabo, Mexico
  38. Alentejo, Portugal
  39. The Catskills, New York
  40. Quebec City, Canada
  41. Canton Valais, Switzerland
  42. Île-de-France
  43. Danang, Vietnam
  44. Chengdu, China
  45. Miami Beach, Florida
  46. Shanghai
  47. Tulsa, Oklahoma
  48. Rome, Italy
  49. Cáceres, Spain
  50. Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico
  51. Baku, Azerbaijan
  52. Kas, Turkey

Considering the North Coast of Peru in the list means that we have many interestimg activities n the area, such as exploring to discover the cultures that once debeloped in the country, the archaeology, the Ecological Reserve,  the gastronomy and the adventure. The North Coast of Peru has more places yet to study and many hidden secret to be discovered. In case you are interetsed in dicovering  North Coast of Peru feel free to contact us by mail : info@peru-travel.info

© Carmen Maria GUEVARA PROTZEL
Photos by Roberto Carlos CASTRO

It Happened on 07 January

Year 1821 Tumbes Independence Day

Tumbes has its origins back in pre-Inca times when it was inhabited by a cultural group of natives called Tumpis.

At its peak, its population is estimated to have reached 178,000.

After 1400,  Inca Pachacuti  ruled over  Tumbes and  the territory became an important political stronghold during the Inca Empire. Later Inca emperor Huayna Capac expanded Tumbes by ordering the construction of roads, houses and palaces.

In Tumbes you can find
  • The  Amotape  Hills  National  Park :  Parque Nacional Cerros de Amotape. covers 91,300 hectares of the Amotapes Mountain Range. It is part of Noroeste Biosphere Reserve’s core zone.
    The Noroeste Biosphere is 231,402 hectares and is made up of Cerros de Amotape National Park, El Angola Game Preserve, and Tumbes Reserved Zone. Supreme Decree Number 0800-75-AG created the park on July 22, 1975.
  •  The  Tumbes  Mangrove  National  Sanctuary is a national park located in the Tumbes Region of #Peru.  It contains many species of flora  and fauna. It is increasingly  popular  for  tourism   because the  beach  resort of Máncora three hours to the south is booming. The  greater part of  the  wetlands  comprise  creeks  (1,800  ha)  and  streams while the remainder is mangroves (1,172ha). The  inclusion   of  Manglares  de Tumbes  in  the  Ramsar List  is a very important  step  forward  in  the conservation of  mangroves, not  only  because  it  is at  the southernmost  limit of  this type of wetland on the  Pacific coast of South America,  but also because of the  ever-increasing  rate of mangrove  destruction for  shrimp and fish farming.

Year 1966 Gran Pajatén was discoverd. It is an archaeological site located in the Andean cloud forests of #Peru,  on the border  of the La Libertad region  and the  San Martín  region,  between  the  Marañon  and Huallaga rivers.

The  archaeological  site lies  in the  Rio Abiseo  National Park,  which was established in 1983. The park was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Natural Site in 1990, and Cultural Site in 1992.

Gran Pajatén sits on a hilltop, and consists of a series of at least 26 circular stone structures and numerous terraces and stairways. The ruins occupy an area of about 20,000 m². The principal buildings are decorated with slate mosaics displaying human, bird and geometric motifs.

Analysis of ceramic samples and radiocarbon dates show that the area was occupied as early as 200 BCE, but the visible building ruins on the present site were constructed during Inca times.

Based  primarily  on  architectural  evidence,  the  settlement is attributed to the Chachapoyas culture.

In  2004 GRBTV Entertainment  did a documentary on a part of Alejandro Guerrero  documentary abour Rio Abiseo and it was called “Expeditions to the Edge” and InkaNatura Travel helped them with logistics while filming this episode.